Building Theory From Case Study Research Eisenhardt Motor

Abstract

This paper describes the process of inducting theory using case studies—from specifying the research questions to reaching closure. Some features of the process, such as problem definition and construct validation, are similar to hypothesis-testing research. Others, such as within-case analysis and replication logic, are unique to the inductive, case-oriented process. Overall, the process described here is highly iterative and tightly linked to data. This research approach is especially appropriate in new topic areas. The resultant theory is often novel, testable, and empirically valid. Finally, framebreaking insights, the tests of good theory (e.g., parsimony, logical coherence), and convincing grounding in the evidence are the key criteria for evaluating this type of research.

Footnotes

  • I appreciate the helpful comments of Paul Adler, Kennith Bettenhausen, Constance Gersick, James Frederickson, James Jucker, Deborah Myerson, Dorothy Leonard-Barton, Robert Sutton, and the participants in (the Stanford NIMH Colloquium. I also benefitted from informal conversations with many participants at the National Science Foundation Conference on Longitudinal Research Methods in Organizations, Austin, 1988.

  • © Academy of Management Review

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